Browsed by
Category: Fishing

Fisheries

Fisheries

Western, gulf region employment State Dept. of Labor and Workforce Development data shows the only two regions of the state showing job growth in April were Southwest and Gulf Coast regions, both up 400 jobs compared with April 2017. The seafood industry is important in both regions. *** Seafood economics of Aleutians A new McDowell Group study of the seafood industry in the Aleutians-Bering Sea region showed a $1.6 billion statewide impact in 2016, and also said that 30 percent…

Read More Read More

Fisheries

Fisheries

Copper River salmon a bust? Is the famed Copper River sockeye shery a bust this year, or are the sh just late? A third scheduled “opener” for the shing near Cordova was cancelled after the rst two openers were ops, with a frac- tion of the predicted sh netted. Fisheries experts think the salmon could be running later due to a cold spring and cool ocean temperatures, but they just don’t know. About 500 vessels were on hand for the…

Read More Read More

Fisheries

Fisheries

Togiak herring shing underway Windy weather hampered the start of the Togiak herring fishery and only 955 tons were landed in the rst two days of shing. The quota is 24,042 tons this year. Department of Fish and Game officials typically allow shing until the quota is neared. *** Salmon campaigns: big bucks The Yes for Salmon and Stand for Alaska campaign fund-raising is off and running even with the Alaska Supreme Court decision on the legality of the Yes…

Read More Read More

Fisheries

Fisheries

2018 will be a low year for salmon State officials are projecting a drop in the 2018 salmon harvest, with 149 million sh compared with 224 million in 2017. Most of the decline is in pink salmon, estimated at a 70 million sh harvest or half of last year. Pinks run in a two-year cycle and 2018 is an off-year. The sockeye salmon harvest is projected at 52 million, down 1.8 million from last year. Sockeyes have a higher value…

Read More Read More

Fisheries

Fisheries

Halibut harvests cut 10% Alaska’s allowable halibut harvest was cut 10 percent by federal fisheries managers to 17.5 million pounds. There was disagreement between Canadian and U.S. officials at the International Pacific Halibut Commission meeting in January, where quotes are normally announced, and the decisions on the U.S. quotas were left to federal officials, which they announced in March. It was just in time for the March 24 start of the halibut fishing season. In Southeast Alaska halibut limits were…

Read More Read More

Fisheries

Fisheries

Prince William Sound crabfishing Prince Williams Sound is seeing the start of a winter tanner crab fishery, its first in decades. Cordova sheries groups have pushed for the crab fishery for several years as a way to expand current harvesting, which is mostly seasonal. State fish and game biologists held off approving the fishery over concerns for the biological stock. Meanwhile, winter snow crab fishery in the Bering Sea is winding down. That got underway in mid-January. *** Sitka prepares…

Read More Read More

Special report: Salmon initiative; HB 199; new habitat permits

Special report: Salmon initiative; HB 199; new habitat permits

Alaska’s natural resource industries are worried about a voter initiative that would create a complex new permitting system for construction projects near streams or other water bodies. “Save Our Salmon,” the ballot initiative, is being opposed in court by the state of Alaska. The state says that only the Legislature can make decisions on allocation of state resources, which is what the ballot proposition would do, state attorneys argue. A state Superior Court has approved the proposal going on the…

Read More Read More

Fisheries

Fisheries

Big cut to Southeast king quota The state Board of Fisheries has sharply cut the quota of allowable king salmon harvests in an effort to help stocks recover. The move will affect troll, gillnet and sport fishermen. Trollers say they will be affected significantly because they make about half of their income from king salmon. *** Octopus plant in Unalaska Construction will start in June on a small octopus processing plant in Unalaska planned by local entrepreneurs, doing business as…

Read More Read More

Fisheries

Fisheries

Ocean conditions affecting fisheries Ocean conditions, likely related to climate change, are beginning to affect Alaska sheries in a signi cant way. The International Halibut Commission will meet Jan. 22-26 in Portland, Ore. to hear scientists explain a drop in halibut numbers by 23 percent and the halibut biomass by 10 percent, which the commission use as a basis for an expected 20 percent cut in commercial harvests. Water temperatures are blamed. Pacific cod harvests in the Gulf of Alaska…

Read More Read More